Date
22 September 2017

Bank chief calls for grain smuggling crackdown, paper says

China must take firm measures to curb large-scale grain and cotton imports and crack down on smuggling activities to ease the pressure on the country’s record-high grain inventory rate, China Daily quoted the head of the nation’s agricultural policy bank as saying. Zheng Hui, president of the Agricultural Development Bank of China (ADBC) and a member of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference National Committee, said China’s high growth rate of grain yield and minimum grain purchase price mechanism have pushed the government to seek more space to store domestic grain and cotton, the report said. The inventory overseen and supported by ADBC’s loans for grain, cotton and edible oil-processing enterprises rose by 35 million metric tons from 2000, the last peak year for excessive grain reserves, to this year. “China still relies on stockpiling and floor purchase prices that are supported by government subsidies to regulate prices,” Zheng said. “But the nation’s minimum grain purchase prices have remained above world levels in recent years, which prompted more imports of products such as soybeans, wheat, corn and cotton.”

– Contact HKEJ [email protected]

SK/RC

 

Excess grain sows seeds of unrest

China Daily, March 11

China must take resolute measures to restrict large-scale grain and cotton imports and crack down on smuggling activities to ease the pressure on the country’s record-high grain inventory rate, the head of China’s agricultural policy bank said.

Zheng Hui, president of the Agricultural Development Bank of China and a member of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference National Committee, said China’s high growth rate of grain yield and minimum grain purchase price mechanism have pushed the government to seek more space to store domestic grain and cotton.

The inventory amount overseen and supported by ADBC’s loans for grain, cotton and edible oil-processing enterprises rose by 35 million metric tons from 2000, the last peak year for excessive grain reserves, to this year. It holds 88 percent of China’s total inventory for agricultural products.
China introduced floor prices for farm products in 2006 to protect farmers from price volatility. The government buys such products as wheat, corn and cotton for State reserves when market prices fall below floor prices. To boost grain production, the central government spent 73.9 billion yuan ($12 billion) to subsidize Chinese farmers between 2005 and 2013.

Unlike China, the prices of farm products in the United States, European Union and Japan are more market-driven, partly because of supply-demand relationships and the function of commodity markets such as the Chicago Board of Trade and Tokyo Commodity Exchange Inc.

“China still relies on stockpiling and floor purchase prices that are supported by government subsidies to regulate prices,” Zheng said. “But the nation’s minimum grain purchase prices have remained above world levels in recent years, which prompted more imports of products such as soybeans, wheat, corn and cotton from the US, Australia, Brazil and India in 2013.”‘=

– Contact HKEJ [email protected]

SK

 

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