Date
16 December 2017
An oil rig owned by a CNPC unit is silhoutted against the gathering dusk. A change in CNPC's hiring policy means workers' children have fewer chances of employment in an oil field subsidiary. Photo: Reuters
An oil rig owned by a CNPC unit is silhoutted against the gathering dusk. A change in CNPC's hiring policy means workers' children have fewer chances of employment in an oil field subsidiary. Photo: Reuters

Job promise turning up empty under new CNPC policy, paper says

If you had a parent working in a certain unit of China National Petroleum Corp. (CNPC), the country’s largest oil company, you probably had a job waiting for you once you got a college or university degree.

Not anymore.

A change in CNPC’s hiring policy has affected recruitment in Daqing Oilfield Co. in Heilongjian province, which used to hire its workers’ children, Sina Finance reported Tuesday.

Starting this year, applicants who are not graduates of a first-class university are required to undergo a one-year training program at Daqing Technical Institute. They will then go through a screening process in which only the best candidates are chosen, the report said.

The policy change is being opposed by workers. They are planning to take their grievances to CNPC in Beijing to demand a full explanation of the new regulation and to the State-owned Assets Supervision and Administration Commission (SASAC), China’s top asset regulator.

Chinese state-owned enterprises have been lumbered with an unwieldy bureaucracy and a bloated work force, prompting the central government to introduce reform.

Their interlocking relationship with government agencies that regulate them is often blamed for breeding corruption, according to media reports.

CNPC vice president Wang Yongchun, a former general manager of Daqing Oilfield Co., is reportedly under investigation for alleged corruption.

Wang was once seen as a successor to former general manager Jiang Jiemin when the latter left CNPC in March 2013 to become head of SASAC. Jiang is now also under investigation, according to media reports.

– Contact HKEJ at [email protected]

JH/JP/RA

 

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