Date
11 December 2017
Many Chinese emigrants left the country in pursuit of a more democratic society, a cleaner and safer environment, and better education. Photo: Internet
Many Chinese emigrants left the country in pursuit of a more democratic society, a cleaner and safer environment, and better education. Photo: Internet

Millions leave China for better life but some are returning

Last year, 9.36 million Chinese left their country to seek better opportunities and living conditions overseas, while some 848,000 foreigners immigrated into China, for a net outflow of about 8.5 million people, a report by the Center for China and Globalization (CCG), a Beijing-based think tank, revealed two months ago. The official People’s Daily had called it “the world’s worst brain drain”.

Most of the Chinese emigrants belonged to the country’s rich and educated elite, and many left in pursuit of a more democratic society, a cleaner and safer environment, and better education.

Chinese emigrants are sprouting all over the world and in such big numbers that some countries and jurisdictions have raised entry barriers to slow down the flood and protect their own workers and industries.

Just recently, Canada scrapped its immigrant investor program, which has been a very popular vehicle among Chinese to enter and live in the North American nation, and have decided to replace it with a new Immigrant Investor Venture Capital Fund, which will require immigrants to invest money, rather than just loan it.

Many families, after leaving China for good, soon discover that their visions of better life are not quite easily achievable in their newly adopted countries, and some realize that their income and prospects were much better back home.

And so while millions of Chinese are eager to leave their country, others see rising opportunities in their homeland and are coming back.

One of them is Yang Yi. At first she had a lot of doubts about returning to China, but after struggling for years in Australia, she finally decided to return to her roots. Now she thinks she made the right decision, CCTV English Channel quoted Yang saying.

Yang opened a high-end bakeshop in northeastern China’s Liaoning province, which immediately flourished with great demand coming from middle-class consumers.

“In another country, the chance for you to work your way up to the top is bleak,” she says. “I saw many stuck in middle management level, even though they live in highly inclusive societies like America.”

– Contact the writer at [email protected]

CG

EJ Insight writer

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