Date
12 December 2017
Democratic Party chairwoman Emily Lau says the party will not be a part of any Alliance for True Democracy meetings after June 22. Photo: Emily Lau's facebook
Democratic Party chairwoman Emily Lau says the party will not be a part of any Alliance for True Democracy meetings after June 22. Photo: Emily Lau's facebook

Democratic Party calls time on alliance after poll

The Democratic Party will cut its ties with a pan-democrat coalition after the Occupy Central poll on electoral reform, saying other parties in the alliance are pushing plans that go beyond the agreed bounds of the coalition. 

Democratic party chairwoman Emily Lau said the party will not take part in meetings organized by the Alliance for True Democracy after June 22, but it will keep pushing its three-track proposal and fight for universal suffrage that complies with international standards and does not include screening of candidates, Ming Pao Daily reported Friday.

“Our party vigorously denounces People Power and the League of Social Democrats for publicly mobilizing participants to vote for proposals that are outside the three-track plan of the Alliance for True Democracy. This has undermined trust and cooperation among the parties,” Lau was quoted as saying after a meeting of party members.

“After June 22, the historical mission of the alliance will be over so it should stop running. So the party will not attend any alliance meeting after that date.”

The three-track proposal is a plan for chief executive candidates to be nominated by the public, the party or the nominating committee.

People Power spokesman Christopher Lau accused the Democratic Party of double standards, saying it did not denounce the Civic Party’s Ronny Tong for suggesting an alternative to the three-track plan.

Chief Secretary Carrie Lam said the three options on the table for the June 22 poll did not amount to a choice because they were all premised on public nomination, according to a separate Ming Pao report.

“Political reform must be based on common ground and resolving differences so that it can lead to the next step and finally result in agreement,” Lam said. 

Lam said the government will carry out the second phase of consultation on political reform, discussing the requirements and procedure for chief executive candidates and offering options.

Justice Secretary Rimsky Yuen said a poll was not enough to legalize any proposal that runs counter to the constitution.

Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Secretary Raymond Tam said the legality of direct public nomination and the three-track proposal is arguable, neither would lead to an easy political consensus and both would be difficult to implement. But he was silent on the legality of public suggestions for candidates to a nominating committee that could also put forward its own candidates.

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