Date
12 December 2017
The new US probe is expected to have a much bigger impact on Chinese solar panel makers as it covers products made with components from Taiwan. Photo: Bloomberg
The new US probe is expected to have a much bigger impact on Chinese solar panel makers as it covers products made with components from Taiwan. Photo: Bloomberg

Chinese solar firms oppose new US anti-dumping probe

Let’s talk.

That’s what Chinese solar panel makers are telling the United States, after it launched another anti-dumping and anti-subsidy probe into their exports.

In a statement, the industry group China Chamber of Commerce for Import and Export of Machinery and Electronic Products (CCCME) said both sides should resolve their trade disputes through negotiations, the 21st Century Business Herald reported Thursday.

The statement was signed by the country’s leading exporters of solar products, including Yingli Green Energy Holding Co. Ltd., Trina Solar Ltd. and Canadian Solar Inc.

The US International Trade Commission (USITC) announced in February it will decide whether to impose higher tariffs on Chinese solar products. The new probe is expected to have a much bigger impact as it covers products made with parts from Taiwan, the report said.

In 2011, the US panel imposed 24-36 percent anti-dumping and anti-subsidy duties on Chinese-made solar components, forcing many manufacturers to use components from Taiwan to skirt the tariffs.

Sun Guangbin, CCCME deputy secretary-general, said Washington had ignored evidence provided by the Chinese side in the previous probe, and this time around, it ignored its own definition of “country of origin” in violation of international trade rules.

No probe should be conducted on Chinese solar products as the components are not made locally, Sun was quoted as saying.

Canadian Solar chief executive Qu Xiaohua said the latest US move will not only affect sales but also have an impact on hundreds of thousands of workers.

The US Department of Commerce is set to announce its preliminary ruling on the anti-subsidy investigation on June 2 and on the anti-dumping probe on July 28, before making a final judgment on Dec. 11. The USITC will decide on Jan. 26 next year if higher tariffs are needed, the report said.

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TL/AC/CG

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