Date
12 December 2017
Cardinal Joseph Zen Ze-kiun gets out the vote for the Occupy Central "referendum" as debate rages in the city over universal suffrage. Photo: HKEJ
Cardinal Joseph Zen Ze-kiun gets out the vote for the Occupy Central "referendum" as debate rages in the city over universal suffrage. Photo: HKEJ

CE 2017 survey: Vote first, fine-tune nomination later

More than half of all Hongkongers think universal suffrage is worth supporting for the 2017 chief executive election even if the nomination process less than ideal, Ming Pao Daily reported Monday, citing a Lingnan University survey.

The survey was commissioned by a group of 15 businesspeople and academics called “Concern Group on Public Opinions on Constitutional Development”.

The results come as Cardinal Joseph Zen Ze-kiun, the former Bishop of Hong Kong, tours the city on foot this week to encourage people to take part in a civil referendum by the Occupy Central movement. The referendum, due to be held from June 20 to June 22, aims to determine the public’s preference on three reform proposals in relation to the 2017 chief executive election. 

Of the 1,020 people canvassed in the university survey, 51.7 percent said public nomination does not go against the Basic Law. And 54 percent said the city should go ahead with universal suffrage in 2017, even if the candidate nomination process is not satisfactory, according to the survey results published Sunday.

The group — which includes three Democratic Party members; Andy Ho On-tat, former information coordinator for ex-chief executive Donald Tsang Yam-kuen; and Centaline Property Agency boss Shih Wing-ching — said it is not affiliated with any party and will do more surveys to gauge responses to ”key developments”.  

When asked about the best way to put forward chief executive candidates, the respondents gave popular nomination the most support, followed by committee nomination and popular recommendation.

Civic Party leader Alan Leong Kah-kit said the questions in the survey were too vague and general, and did not advance discussions on political reform.

Democratic Party chairwoman Emily Lau Wai-hing said it is understandable that citizens want suffrage to be in place before any reform but the party only supports a nomination system that is consistent with international standards. 

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