Date
18 December 2017
Locked out of live match broadcasts, online sites in China are coming up with new ways to cash in on the World Cup. Photo: Tencent
Locked out of live match broadcasts, online sites in China are coming up with new ways to cash in on the World Cup. Photo: Tencent

Online media find way to score World Cup goal

State broadcaster CCTV may have refused to resell its exclusive World Cup live broadcasting rights to online video sites but the digital upstarts have still found a way break through CCTV’s defense.

CCTV resold broadcasting rights to the event four years ago to six online streaming sites for 15 million yuan each. But instead of a pay day, the state-owned broadcaster found that it missed out on a lot more in advertising revenue as audiences were diverted to other media.

This time it wants to keep all the advertising dollars, a flood of cash that could reach 1.5 billion yuan (US$242 million), according to a Guangzhou Daily report.

Not to be outplayed, Tencent, Sina and a number of websites have instead employed pundits to produce special features and review high-profile matches, pulling in crowds of viewers.

This self-generated content is expected to produce 700 million yuan in advertising income for online sites, with Tencent pocketing 230 million yuan and Sina 100 million yuan.

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SK

EJ Insight writer

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