Date
24 August 2017
Chief Secretary Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor, flanked by Secretary of Justice Rimsky Yuen Kwok-keung (right) and Secretary for Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Raymond Tam Chi-yuen, announces the results of the first round of public consultation on polit
Chief Secretary Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor, flanked by Secretary of Justice Rimsky Yuen Kwok-keung (right) and Secretary for Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Raymond Tam Chi-yuen, announces the results of the first round of public consultation on polit

Mainstream opinion supports nomination committee, govt says

The power to select the chief executive is only vested in a nominating committee and such power must not be undermined or bypassed, the Hong Kong government said, citing the “mainstream opinion” of the public.

The nomination committee has substantive power to nominate chief executive candidates, according to a report submitted to the National People’s Congress Standing Committee on political reform. Such power of nomination must not be undermined or bypassed directly or indirectly, it said.

The composition of the nominating committee should be decided with reference to the existing four sectors of the election committee in equal proportions, in order to meet the requirement that it must be “broadly representative”, it said.

The report cited “considerable views” that the nominating committee should be increased “pro rata” from the 1,200-member election committee to “accommodate new subsectors”, but it also noted “quite a number of views” that the number of members should remain at 1,200.

There are different views on how the nominating committee should choose the chief executive candidates. Some suggest a two-step approach, with the persons contending for nomination to be recommended by a certain number of nominating committee members; and in the second stage, the nominating committee shall nominate a number of candidates among those who have been recommended.

Moreover, “quite a number of views” suggest that a person contending for nomination has to obtain support from at least a certain proportion of members of the nominating committee in order to formally become a candidate, it said. This is to demonstrate that the candidate has cross-sector support.

However, some consider that the nomination threshold should remain at one-eighth of the membership, like the existing election committee. There are also some suggesting other proposals on nomination thresholds and nominating procedures, including introducing “civic nomination” and “party nomination” outside the nominating committee, it said.

The government also said the majority of Hong Kong people are eager to have universal suffrage in the chief executive election in 2017. It said the community generally agrees that the chief executive must love the country and love Hong Kong.

The Hong Kong government will launch a second round of public consultation, and seek to submit a resolution on the specific amendments to the Basic Law to the Legislative Council for scrutiny around early 2015.

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JZ/JP/CG

Freelance journalist

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