Date
19 August 2017
Randomly arranged on a lawn outside Raffles City in Beijing, these paper pandas have been attracting curious onlookers from behind a security fence. Photo: Chinanews.com
Randomly arranged on a lawn outside Raffles City in Beijing, these paper pandas have been attracting curious onlookers from behind a security fence. Photo: Chinanews.com

Paper pandas sweeping up Beijing — but they’re knock-offs

They’ve graced an airport, an airline cabin, a theme park, a monument and a bridge in Hong Kong and now some are drawing curious onlookers in Beijing.

The problem is, they’re not the real thing.

Fake replicas of French artist Paulo Gangreon’s paper mache pandas have found their way into a corner of Beijing, according to Chinanews.com.

The website posted photos of 300 knock-offs of China’s national symbol arranged randomly on a lawn outside Raffles City hotel.

Onlookers have been flocking in, taking pictures from outside a fence, according to the website.

Gangreon created 1,600 paper pandas and brought them around the world to raise awareness of wildlife conservation and raise funds for the World Wildlife Fund.

During a month-long visit to Hong Kong in June, they were photographed aboard a Cathay Pacific flight, at Hong Kong airport, Ocean Park, Tsing Ma Bridge and the Golden Buddha statue on Lantau Island, among other landmarks. 

Last summer, a giant inflatable duck by Dutch artist Florentijn Hofman took to Hong Kong harbor to spread the message of harmony without borders.

A fake rubber duckie showed up in the mainland not long after.  

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A woman takes a selfie, blissfully unaware she’s posing with fakes. Photo: Chinanews.com


Hard to tell what could have inspired these copycats. Photo: Chinanews.com


Panda and bamboo. You’d think the animal is in its natural habitat but look again — it’s a fake replica. Photo: Chinanews.com


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