Date
18 December 2017
A woman smokes in New York. Some 18 percent of Americans were smokers in 2012, down from 42 percent in 1965. Photo: Reuters
A woman smokes in New York. Some 18 percent of Americans were smokers in 2012, down from 42 percent in 1965. Photo: Reuters

More US households smoke-free, study says

Nearly twice as many US households are smoke-free compared with 20 years ago, reflecting an increased awareness of the health hazards from secondhand smoke, but too many people still are exposed.

In the early 1990s, 43 percent of US homes were smoke-free, a figure that rose to 83 percent in 2010-2011, Reuters reported Monday, citing a federal study issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

More than 90 percent of homes without a smoker and nearly half of those with at least one adult smoker had smoke-free rules.

“It’s a shift in social norms,” said Brian King, lead author of the CDC study. “People no longer see smoking around non-smokers as socially acceptable behavior.”

Still, he said, more progress is needed, particularly in homes where smokers live, as secondhand smoke from cigarettes kills an estimated 41,000 non-smokers annually.

The increased number of smoke-free homes is attributable in part to the diminishing segment of Americans who smoke.

Some 18 percent of Americans were smokers in 2012, down from 42 percent in 1965, the CDC said.

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RA/JL

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