Date
22 September 2017
Only 1 percent of EK Immigration Consulting’s business comes from Hong Kong people and the remaining 99 percent is from mainlanders. Photo: Wen Wei Po
Only 1 percent of EK Immigration Consulting’s business comes from Hong Kong people and the remaining 99 percent is from mainlanders. Photo: Wen Wei Po

Immigration firm turns focus on mainlanders

In his experience, a client will give him business three times at the most, said Eddie Kwan King-hung, chairman of EK Immigration Consulting.

The first time is to help send the client’s children to study in North America. Then they will arrange to bring their children back to Hong Kong to enter local universities.

As for the parents, most of them will opt to migrate to small countries to get the British National passport so that they can visit their children more conveniently. They do not want to spend years in foreign countries and become residents because of their business ties, according to Apple Daily, citing Kwan.

The popular options include island countries in the Caribbean such as Antigua and Saint Kitts.

The immigration fees under investor programs could cost as little as US$300,000 and the application process could only take six to eight months. Successful applicants can then go to Commonwealth countries without a visa.

EK Immigration Consulting, which has 20 percent of the local market share and 10 percent on the mainland, is now focusing on mainland Chinese clients.

Only 1 percent of the company’s business comes from Hong Kong people and the remaining 99 percent is from mainlanders. The consulting fee for each case is 60,000 yuan (US$9,785) to 80,000 yuan.

Kwan said that the peak years of Hong Kong emigration were before 1997. Demand has significantly dropped since then.

He said that among those who followed their parents overseas when they were small, 40 percent have chosen to move back to Hong Kong or the mainland to develop their careers.

More Hong Kong people have consulted the firm about migration amid the ongoing controversies on electoral reform, but they do not have any plan to move yet, he said.

Meanwhile, Kwan said that he is putting the company’s listing plan on hold as Canada has decided to halt its investor immigration program.

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JH/JP/JL

EJ Insight reporter

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