Date
22 September 2017
Dyslexics have difficulty reading and writing but they have an aptitude for deciphering facts from patterns which can be useful in fighting terrorism. Photo: krmg.com, theboohers.org
Dyslexics have difficulty reading and writing but they have an aptitude for deciphering facts from patterns which can be useful in fighting terrorism. Photo: krmg.com, theboohers.org

Britain using dyslexic spies in anti-terror fight

Britain’s main surveillance agency is using the services of more than 100 dyslexic and dyspraxic people in the country’s fight against terror, The Telegraph reported.

The Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) has employed the “neuro-diverse” spies for their ability to analyze complex information in a “dispassionate, logical and analytical” way and help combat threats, the report said.

While dyslexics find it hard to read, write or interpret words, they often have an extraordinary aptitude for deciphering facts from patterns or events.

IT specialist Matt is chairman of the dyslexic and dyspraxic support community at GCHQ, which supports the 120 “neuro-diverse” staff employed by the agency.

“What people don’t realize is that people with neuro-diversity usually have a ‘spiky-skills’ profile, which means that certain skill areas will be below par and others may be well above,” the GCHQ official told Sunday Times.

“My reading might be slower than some individuals and maybe my spelling is appalling, and my handwriting definitely is. But if you look at the positive side, my 3D special-perception awareness and creativity is in the top 1 per cent of my peer group,” he added.

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RC

British surveillance agency GCHQ is employing ‘neuro-diverse’ people to help analyze complex information. Photo: wikipedia.org


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