Date
15 December 2017
Student protesters hunker down in Tamar Park outside government headquarters. The group borrowed heavily from the Taiwan Sunflower Movement in logistics support and organization.Photo: Reuters
Student protesters hunker down in Tamar Park outside government headquarters. The group borrowed heavily from the Taiwan Sunflower Movement in logistics support and organization.Photo: Reuters

HK class boycott borrows from Taiwan Sunflower protest

Protesting Hong Kong students are taking a leaf out of Taiwan’s Sunflower Movement playbook and improving on it, Ming Pao Daily reported Friday.

Most of the similarities are in the way logistics are handled and groups are organized.

However, unlike the Taiwanese movement which saw an unprecedented student takeover of parliament in March and April to oppose a cross-strait services trade agreement, the Hong Kong class boycott is largely a 12-hour assembly with more group interaction, the report said, citing its leaders.

The protest entered its fifth and final day Friday but organizers have vowed to extend the action if the government does not respond to their demand for talks on democratic reform.

They have challenged Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying to come out and face them but no such meeting has taken place.

The protesters from 24 colleges and universities are divided into seven sections, with prefects and teams providing supplies, communications facilities and technology support.

Lai Choi-yin, who oversees logistics, said they borrowed some ideas from the Sunflower Movement such as mobile charging stations and wi-fi access sharing to enable the protesters to update their Facebook status any time.

Sing Ming, an associate professor of the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology who witnessed the Taiwan student protest, said the Hong Kong students have adopted some of its useful features such as videotaping lectures and posting speeches online.

Sing said the Hong Kong sessions are broadcast live on social media and volunteers are on hand to take notes.

Former legislative councilor Tanya Chan, who also witnessed the Sunflower Movement, said more lectures are being held in Hong Kong.

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