Date
22 November 2017
The auxiliary police officer identified only as Joe (in dark T-shirt and wearing a police uniform) pledges his allegiance to the protest movement. Photos: Facebook, nowTV
The auxiliary police officer identified only as Joe (in dark T-shirt and wearing a police uniform) pledges his allegiance to the protest movement. Photos: Facebook, nowTV

Auxiliary police officer quits job to support Occupy campaign

He has been accused of being a government spy, an undercover police agent who wanted to sabotage the protest movement.

But for Joe Yeung (楊逸朗), a university student and member of the Auxiliary Police Force, nothing speaks better of his genuine desire to press for democracy in Hong Kong than his active involvement in the Occupy campaign since it started last week. 

Yeung, who was seen on television helping remove the barricades outside the government headquarters in Admiralty in order to provide access for civil servants who were to return to work on Monday, was accused by some netizens of being an undercover police officer within the ranks of the protesters, according to Apple Daily.

He admitted he was a member of the auxiliary police force, but he defended his “loyalty” to the campaign by saying that he has been manning the protesters’ barricades in Admiralty since the start of the civil disobedience campaign.

In fact, he said he was a victim of the pepper spray and tear gas that riot police fired at the protesters on Sept. 28.

He also said his Facebook page is filled with status updates calling for public support for the protest movement. 

“The way the police handled the crowd was entirely different from what I have learnt from the police academy,” Yeung said, adding that the protesters were unarmed.

He also slammed the police for delivering weapons and equipment into the government headquarters under the pretext of delivering food supplies.

“We have sworn to always serve with honesty and integrity, but where have all those values gone?”

Yeung, who is turning 21 in a few days, tendered his resignation from the auxiliary police force on Sunday night, as he wanted to remove lingering doubts in the minds of his fellow pro-democracy protesters.

He also pledged to continue manning the movement’s Admiralty base for as long as he could.

Meanwhile, former assistant police commissioner Tang Hau-kong said the scuffles between the pro-democracy protesters and the anti-Occupy camp in Mong Kok were not at all surprising, am730 reported.

People whose livelihood has been affected by the Occupy campaign would definitely come out and such incidents were expected in districts like Mong Kok and Causeway Bay where there are many retail shops.

Tang refused to comment on the handling of the protesting crowds by the police, but said he was disgusted by allegations suggesting that the police had teamed up with triad members.

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