Date
21 August 2017
A women's toilet is well stocked with all kinds of amenities. Signs remind users they can protest and keep the toilet clean at the same time. Photo: vjmedia.com.hk, Facebook, Mingpao
A women's toilet is well stocked with all kinds of amenities. Signs remind users they can protest and keep the toilet clean at the same time. Photo: vjmedia.com.hk, Facebook, Mingpao

Toilets spick and span at Occupy sites

Going to the toilet around the areas occupied by protesters may be a daunting business because they may be dirty, never mind the long queues. Not so, apparently.

The toilets used by the protesters are spick and span, with some comparable to those in shopping malls in cleanliness, according to Sky Post. 

They are also well stocked with amenities.

The public toilet outside the government headquarters boasts washing basins swamped with sun block, moisturising cream and skin-care products — donated by the public. Pictures of the toilet went viral over the past few days on the Internet.

Some showed the female toilet dressed like a mini make-up room, with no lack of skin-care products, contact lenses solution, mouthwash, cotton buds and even facial masks.

The phenomenon is a reflection of an increased civic consciousness among Hong Kong people, some scholars said.

Yan, a member of the post-90s generation, said it is very heart-warming to know the public are so thoughtful. Despite the queues most of the time, the hygiene standard inside the toilet is amazingly high, thanks to the considerate crowds.

Another participant surnamed Wong said there are signs within the public toilets urging people to clean up after use, which is probably another reason why the facilities are well kept.

“Having a clean toilet to use is a consolation as female students could not take showers while staying overnight out on the streets,” she said.

Men and women nowadays are more beauty-savvy, said Professor Angela Wong, a co-director of the Gender Research Centre at the Hong Kong Institute of Asia-Pacific Studies.

They want to “look good despite joining a street protest”, she said. There is “no contradiction” between the two matters but “it can be seen as a sense of humor”.

In exemplifying the Hong Kong spirit which is about helping others whenever possible, an advertising executive has started a campaign on Facebook to urge the public to patronize the small shops and mobile stalls that have been affected by the protests, in order to make up for their economic losses.

The Facebook page, which details the location of these shops and stalls with small features introducing their products and services, has accumulated 6,700 likes in nine days.

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EL/AC/JL

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