Date
19 August 2017
This isn't your grandfather's vinyl record. It's a newly minted best seller that is part of a great revival. Photo: Internet
This isn't your grandfather's vinyl record. It's a newly minted best seller that is part of a great revival. Photo: Internet

Who says vinyl is dead?

Like the radio in this era of television and the internet, the vinyl record in this digital age is a relic of bygone days that refuses to go away.

Radio was supposed to die when television came and people began hitting the internet for anything they want.

Instead, radio prospered on the back of the very technology that was expected to obliterate it. So is the venerable vinyl record enjoying a great revival thanks to a music revolution triggered by online songs.

By the end of the year, vinyl albums are expected to top one million, their biggest sales for almost two decades, according to Mail Online.

Almost 800,000 vinyl albums have been sold in the first nine months, outstripping last year’s 780,674, music data provider Official Charts Co. said.

The last time vinyl hit seven-figure sales was in 1996 when 1,083,206 albums changed hands and The Score by Fugees was the year’s biggest long-player.

New data from Music industry body BPI shows September was the busiest month of the year with 112,000 vinyl albums sold.

Vinyl albums hit an all-time low in 2007 with only 205,000 copies, a fifth of this year’s predicted sales.

The format fought back the following year as the vinyl revival began and the tally has continued to nudge upwards, the report said.

This year, 112 releases have topped 1,000 copies, more than double the 50 which had done so in the first nine months of last year. Only one of the top 10 vinyl albums for this year was actually released for the first time in 2014 – the self-titled debut album by Royal Blood.

A BPI spokeswoman vinyl “may once have been considered a by-product of a bygone era but it is now well and truly a flourishing format making a come-back in a digital age”.

Vinyl enthusiasts are now able to enjoy the renaissance of the format with a string of releases being made available on the format from emerging and established acts, she said.

Whoever said vinyl is dead hasn’t been reading the news. 

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RC/RA

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