Date
21 August 2017
Ken Tsang is said to have waited three hours for his deposition to begin. It took him nine hours to complete the process which his lawyer described as 'shabby'. Photos: now.com, YouTube
Ken Tsang is said to have waited three hours for his deposition to begin. It took him nine hours to complete the process which his lawyer described as 'shabby'. Photos: now.com, YouTube

Lawyer blasts ‘shabby’ nine-hour Tsang police deposition

A democracy activist, who was shown in a video last week being beaten by a group of policemen, said it took him nine hours on Sunday to complete a police statement before what his lawyer said were “hostile” investigators.

Social worker Ken Tsang, a member of the opposition Civic Party, was asked irrelevant questions after he waited three hours for his statement to be taken, Ming Pao Daily reported Monday, citing Tsang lawyer Michael Vidler.

Vidler said the process was handled by the Regional Crime Unit instead of the Complaints Against Police Office (CAPO).

He criticized the procedure as “shabby” and said he has not seen anything like it in years.

The report did not say if the police were asked for comment.

In an interview with am730, Tsang said he has been having difficulty sleeping since the incident and considers himself lucky his party and co-workers have taken up his cause.

Otherwise, the incident might have gone unattended, he said.   

CAPO officers present during Tsang’s deposition said there is enough evidence to arrest the seven officers, according to Vidler.

However, they refused to answer when pressed by Tsang’s lawyers why no arrests have been made, Vidler was quoted as saying.

Vidler and his team are considering another complaint with regard to the beating and have asked for more information about the officers.

Tsang sustained bruises to his face and body from the beating which was shown in a four-minute television clip.

Meanwhile, former police superintendent Gregory Lau confirmed to Ming Pao Daily that he was responsible for a recording in which he is heard telling the seven officers to invoke trial by publicity to have any proceedings against them quashed permanently.

The recording has gone viral on the internet.

Eric Cheung of the University of Hong Kong law faculty, said there is no precedent in which a case was permanently terminated due to media coverage.

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