Date
23 August 2017
Riot police clash with pro-democracy protesters in Mongkok on Oct. 19. The police have been accused of using excessive force in trying to clear the streets. Photo: Reuters
Riot police clash with pro-democracy protesters in Mongkok on Oct. 19. The police have been accused of using excessive force in trying to clear the streets. Photo: Reuters

No premature judgment on police brutality complaints: IPCC chief

The Independent Police Complaints Council (IPCC) will not make any premature judgment on complaints against police brutality, its chairman said, adding that the agency will wait for official investigation reports.

IPCC, which has been established to ensure that the police’s investigations into reportable complaints are fair and just and that every complaint is dealt with properly and impartially, has been keeping a close eye on the developments related to the ongoing Occupy protests, Singtao Daily quoted Larry Kwok as saying.

His remarks came after several clashes broke out between the police and protesters since the latter blockaded some streets since late last month. The police has been bombarded by complaints that it used violent tactics to beat back the protesters, with allegations of abuse of power, battery and improper discharge of duty being thrown around.

The Complaints Against Police Office has so far received more than 900 complaints against the police, including over 200 cases involving the occupied area in Mong Kok and over 300 cases in Admiralty, Kwok said, adding that 23 cases that were considered serious have been referred to the Serious Complaints Committee of IPCC.

He predicted that the complaints will increase in number but said the IPCC does not intend to send its members to the occupied sites for inspection as such a move may potentially aggravate chaos as well as affect independence and fairness in dealing with the complaints .

Steve Hui, chief superintendent of the police public relations bureau, said on Tuesday that anyone who is disturbed by the police acts can file a complaint for investigations.

Meanwhile, he did not respond directly to a question from the media whether police officers are allowed to beat protesters on their heads with batons. He merely stressed that the police will use minimum level of force and that batons have other uses.

He said the police have arrested 87 men and 7 women in the occupied area in Mong Kong, which is now considered a high-risk area. As of Tuesday morning, 61 policemen were injured, he said.

– Contact us at [email protected]

TL/AC/RC

EJI Weekly Newsletter

Please click here to unsubscribe