Date
19 August 2017
A protester goes about his tasks in a tent. A growing number of Hong Kong people support the student-led democracy movement. Photo: AFP
A protester goes about his tasks in a tent. A growing number of Hong Kong people support the student-led democracy movement. Photo: AFP

Survey shows rising support for election proposal

Public support for Beijing’s proposed election framework for the 2017 chief executive election is rising, Ming Pao Daily reported Thursday, citing a survey by the Chinese University of Hong Kong.

At the same time, more people back the ongoing democracy protests at 37.8 percent, up 6.7 percentage points from a month ago/ About 35.5 percent are against it, down from 46.3 percent.

The survey polled 802 respondents 15 years old and above from Oct. 8 to 15.

Nearly four in 10 would support the election proposal even if the nomination process excludes candidates deemed “unsuitable” by Beijing for their political views, up 6.8 percentagae points from a previous survey.

The percentage of people who said the proposal must be rejected fell 5.2 percentage points to 48.5 percent. 

Nearly six in 10 who said they reject the proposal want Legco to pass it if the government lowers the nomination threshold for candidates, the report said.

About 6.1 percent oppose the proposal even if the nomination threshold is lowered.

More than four in 10 said they will support the proposal if Beijing agrees to continue reform in the election process in the future while three in 10 said they disagree with it regardless of anything Beijing does.

Clement So, dean of the School of Journalism and Communication of the Chinese University of Hong Kong, said the survey results suggested that people want a more democratic nomination committee rather than political assurances on future reform.

He said more people oppose the proposal than support it.

Labor Party chief Lee Cheuk-yan said no matter what Beijing promises regarding the nomination committee, candidates will still be pre-selected by the central government.

Meanwhile, public distrust of the police has risen, the survey shows. 

About 27 percent of the respondents said they don’t trust the police, rising to 37 percent on Oct. 15 when seven policemen were shown on video beating Civic Party member Ken Tsang.

About 37.8 percent said they support the protest, up 6.7 percentage points from a month ago, while 35.5 percent are against it, down from 46.3 percent.

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