Date
19 September 2017
Nancy Kissel says she asks for forgiveness and repents in her search for peace. She said she cannot explain what happened on the night she bludgeoned her husband to death. Photo: Bloomberg
Nancy Kissel says she asks for forgiveness and repents in her search for peace. She said she cannot explain what happened on the night she bludgeoned her husband to death. Photo: Bloomberg

Nancy Kissel: No regrets 11 years after killing banker husband

You must remember her.

Nancy Kissel was a rich Hong Kong housewife before her husband’s murder by her hand 11 years ago thrust her into world notoriety.

Convicted by two juries for the killing which came to be known as the Milkshake Murder, Kissel, 50 is serving a life sentence in a maximum security prison not from the the oceanfront luxury home she shared with her husband Robert, a top banker and financial mover and shaker.

“This is my home,” she told Bloomberg when asked if she thinks of ever leaving the prison.

And in her search for peace, she said she asks for forgiveness and repents. “That’s very different from regret.”

To this day, she said it’s hard for her to say what happened that night.

“I can’t spend my time explaining the unexplainable. I’d rather try to seek a peaceful heart,” she said.

“I don’t know how to undo something I never understood,” Kissel said through an intercom from behind metal bars.

Asked if she had any regrets, including meeting Robert, she said her children wouldn’t exist if they hadn’t met.

“Why on earth would you ask that question? They are such beautiful human beings, now the glory is shining on through them. They were such gifts that I had.”

Kissel’s three children — a son and two daughters — live with Robert’s sister, Jane Clayton, near Seattle, Washington. Kissel isn’t in touch with them.

“My children … need to heal from something they won’t ever understand,” she said.

The Kissels moved in 1998 from New York to Hong Kong, where Robert worked on distressed-asset deals for Goldman Sachs Group Inc. and then Merrill Lynch & Co.

His body, wrapped in a sleeping bag and rolled up in a carpet, was found in a family storeroom by police after a colleague filed a missing persons report on Nov. 6, 2003.

Nancy Kissel argued in her first trial that she was defending herself in a fight and in her second trial, won after errors were found in the first, that she was provoked and that depression and battered woman syndrome impaired her judgment.

She was convicted unanimously both times and sentenced to life in prison.

Prosecutors told jurors at both trials that Nancy killed Robert by drugging him with sedatives crushed into a milkshake and then bashing his head in with an eight-pound metal statuette.

She earlier conducted online searches for sleeping pills and had begun an affair with an electrician who outfitted the family vacation home in Vermont, they said.

Nancy maintained at trial that the web searches were a reflection of her own mental illness and suicidal thoughts, and that her judgment was impaired when she fought with Robert on the night he died.

She argued that she had been physically and sexually abused for years and witnesses attested to seeing her with bruises and in a body brace.

“You need to find your identity. I’m still trying,” she told Bloomberg.

“Hiding behind luxury is easy, that way no one has to ask if everything is all right. And no one ever did.”

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RA

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