Date
25 September 2017
Taiwan's election campaign is a raucous affair worthy of its reputation as a tourist attraction. Mainlanders are increasingly drawn to the idea of seeing democracy in action. Photo: Reuters
Taiwan's election campaign is a raucous affair worthy of its reputation as a tourist attraction. Mainlanders are increasingly drawn to the idea of seeing democracy in action. Photo: Reuters

Mainlanders flocking to Taiwan to see democracy in action

Step right up and see democracy in action.

Along those lines, web portal Sina.com is touting Taiwan’s upcoming election campaign as a tourist attraction to intrigued mainlanders.

Tourists are encouraged to “enjoy the carnival-like atmosphere” spiced up with shows, food and giveaways.

A word of caution: they cannot engage in any political activity such as distributing flyers, taking campaign flags or openly supporting a candidate.

And they should mind their colors.

Most candidates are from the ruling Kuomintang and the opposition Democratic Progressive Party, known as blue camp and green camp respectively.

Wearing the wrong color could result in unintended consequences for visitors.

Mainlanders in increasing numbers are being drawn to the idea of seeing for themselves what a political campaign looks like, according to Ming Pao Daily.

Taiwan’s local elections will be held on Nov. 29 to elect municipal mayors, county magistrates, city mayors, municipal, county and city councilmen, township chiefs, ward chiefs, and aboriginal district chiefs.

On the eve of the election, Taipei is transformed into a giant carnival, with political heavyweights and celebrities mixing with the crowds.

Taiwan President Ma Ying-jeou told an international election observer group that Chinese are excited to witness something they have never seen in mainland China.

Taiwan has been working to prove that western-style democracy can evolve in Chinese society.

– Contact us at english@hkej.com

TL/AC/RA

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