Date
23 September 2017
A mobile phone displays a timer indicating that the battery has been fully charged under 30 seconds at a StoreDot laboratory. Photo: Reuters
A mobile phone displays a timer indicating that the battery has been fully charged under 30 seconds at a StoreDot laboratory. Photo: Reuters

Recharge your phone in seconds? Now you can

If your mobile phone dies on you the next very next time you use it, you’re not alone.

But mobile battery life need not be an issue if a recharge is quickly available — and now it is. 

An Israeli has developed technology that can charge a mobile phone in a few seconds and an electric car in minutes.

These advances that could transform two of the world’s most dynamic consumer industries, according to Reuters.

Using nano-technology to synthesize artificial molecules, Tel Aviv-based StoreDot says it has developed a battery that can store a much higher charge more quickly, in effect acting like a super-dense sponge to soak up power and retain it.

The prototype is still far too bulky for a mobile phone, the company believes it will be ready by 2016 to market a slim battery that can absorb and deliver a day’s power for a smartphone in just 30 seconds.

“These are new materials, they have never been developed before,” said Doron Myersdorf, the founder and chief executive of StoreDot, whose investors include Russian billionaire and Chelsea soccer club owner Roman Abramovich.

The innovation is based around the creation of “nanodots”, which StoreDot describes as bio-organic peptide molecules. Nanodots alter the way a battery behaves to allow the rapid absorption and, critically, the retention of power.

The company has raised US$48 million from two rounds of funding, including backing from a leading mobile phone maker. Myersdorf declined to name the company, but said it was Asian.

With the number of smartphone users forecast to reach 1.75 billion this year, StoreDot sees a big market, and some experts think that — with more work — it could be on to a winner.

Myersdorf said a fast-charge phone would cost US$100 to US$150 more than current models and would ultimately be able to handle 1,500 recharge/discharge cycles, giving it about three years of life.

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RA

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