Date
24 September 2017
Wu Chi-wai (third from right) turned himself in to the police for participating in the Occupy protests, even though his party didn't deem such action necessary. Photo: HKEJ
Wu Chi-wai (third from right) turned himself in to the police for participating in the Occupy protests, even though his party didn't deem such action necessary. Photo: HKEJ

Wu Chi-wai walks a lonely path among pan-democratic lawmakers

Wu Chi-wai of the Democratic Party was the only lawmaker to turn himself in to the police on Wednesday from among the group of 26 pan-democratic legislators in the city.

Wu insisted on turning himself in even though such action was not what the Democratic Party has preferred for its lawmaker members, Ming Pao Daily News reported.

Wu said he stayed at the Admiralty site for a month and that he took care of supplies for the protesters. He was prepared for arrest from day one, he said.

The lawmaker said his party was informed of his plan to surrender Wednesday and that they respected the decision.

He said he is aware that he could lose his Legislative Councilor seat if he is convicted, but insisted that he is willing to pay the price if his actions can help propel the development of democracy in Hong Kong.

Two members from the Civic Party joined in the surrender initiative, while former lawmaker Tanya Chan, who had once participated in the movement in a high profile way, refused to comment on the action, insisting she was there at the police station as a volunteer lawyer.

Martin Lee, founding chairman of the Democratic Party, said he will stay in Admiralty and be prepared to be arrested peacefully, the report said.

Former Democratic Party lawmaker Yeung Sum said there was division of work among the party’s members, with legislative councilors told to pursue democracy within the establishment, while those without public duties, such as himself and Cheung Man-kwong, would support the three founders of Occupy Central Movement as they surrendered to the police.

Fellow lawmaker James To said he doesn’t believe that he needs to turn himself in because he showed up at occupy central gatherings. The important question now is not whether to turn oneself in, but rather how to move forward political reform, he said.

Civic Party chief Alan Leong said he opted to defend himself in court when he first signed up for the Occupy Central campaign.

Avery Ng, vice-chairman of the League of Social Democrats, said no party member has surrendered, as the entire campaign is still ongoing.

Fellow lawmaker Leung Kwok-hung and at least five other members were arrested during the occupy protest, hence there was no need to turn anyone in again, he said.

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