Date
22 September 2017
Cheng Yik-lam (left) and Ng Man-him are pressing on with their hunger strike after student leader Joshua Wong and two of his Scholarism followers ended days of fasting. Photo: Dash
Cheng Yik-lam (left) and Ng Man-him are pressing on with their hunger strike after student leader Joshua Wong and two of his Scholarism followers ended days of fasting. Photo: Dash

Four still on hunger strike after Joshua Wong ends fast

Two student protesters are continung a hunger strike after protest leader Joshua Wong ended 108 hours of fasting.

Cheng Yik-lam and Ng Man-him, both from student activist group Scholarism of which Wong is the founder and convenor, began their action on Wednesdsay and are pressing on in hopes of getting the government to reopen talks on political reform.

They were joined by two people who started to take nothing but liquids from 10 p.m. on Sunday.

The four are in separate tents in the Admiralry protest site where pro-democracy student protesters have camped out for more than two months.

Wong said he hopes there will not be another round of hunger strike, saying there is not enough medical personnel to attend to the strikers.

He stopped short of discouraging his Scholarism followers but said non-members should not take such action.   

Two of Wong’s Scholarism colleagues — Prince Wong and Isabella Lo — have also ended their fast after 118 and 95 hours, respectively. Prince Wong was taken to a hospital.

Wong Sin-yee, who started a Facebook group to encourage people to go on hunger strike for 28 hours, said the action is intended to support Hong Kong’s democratic aspirations, not only as a show of solidarity with the Scholarism strikers, Ming Pao Daily reported Monday.

He said Hong Kong people should take the cudgels for democracy and not merely rely on the students.

More than 50 people have responded to his appeal but it’s not clear if they will follow his lead.

Meanwhile, executive councilor Regina Ip accused some politicians of grandstanding in trying to mediate between the government and the protesters.

She questioned whether these politicians have the qualification to act as middlemen.

Ip made the remarks after former Liberal Party leader James Tien and two party members visited Wong and his fellow hunger strikers on Friday and offered to help broker talks with the government.

In November, Ip said the student leaders could call her if they wanted help in arranging a meeting with officials in Beijing.    

Liberal Party honorary chairperson Selina Chow lashed back, calling Ip’s remarks biased.

Chow said her party is sincere in trying to resolve the stand-off.

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