Date
16 December 2017
The protest slogan "I want genuine universal suffrage" is printed on HK$20 and HK$100 notes. A bank spokesman warned that defacing or damaging banknotes is illegal. Photo: Facebook
The protest slogan "I want genuine universal suffrage" is printed on HK$20 and HK$100 notes. A bank spokesman warned that defacing or damaging banknotes is illegal. Photo: Facebook

Occupy banknotes become latest form of protest

What will they think of next?

Occupy protesters have occupied streets, unfurled yellow umbrellas on the graduation stage, hung a giant banner on Lion Rock, and done countless other gimmicks to promote their pro-democracy campaign. Now they’re spreading the message through banknotes.

A number of banknotes issued by Bank of China (BOC) were found to have been imprinted with the popular protest slogan “I want a genuine universal suffrage” on the watermark area, Sing Tao Daily reported Tuesday. 

Images of the defaced HK$20 and HK$100 bills were posted online by a person who claimed to have received the money.

A BOC spokesperson said defaced or damaged banknotes could become void and those responsible for such illegal action could face criminal charges.

The person who uploaded the images on Facebook found the action amusing — and smart because even those who are against the Occupy campaign would not dare tear up the notes. They would want to dispose of the bills as soon as possible, but they would only help circulate the notes and spread the political message. 

The netizen, however, warned others against copying the trick as it is illegal.

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