Date
16 December 2017
It's the first time the Chinese currency has been misspelled in an official document since the Hong Kong government began promoting it. Photos: Policy Address, Bloomberg
It's the first time the Chinese currency has been misspelled in an official document since the Hong Kong government began promoting it. Photos: Policy Address, Bloomberg

Oops, Leung speech gets Chinese currency wrong

Someone ought to proof-read Leung Chun-ying’s speeches from now on.

That’s after his most important speech of the year, the chief executive’s Policy Address, misspelled renminbi, the Chinese currency.

An alert reader spotted the typo in the English version of the speech, which partly says “… increasing liquidity in the renmenbi (RMB) market…” in an item about the Shanghai-Hong Kong Stock Connect. 

Leung was describing Hong Kong’s important role in the global market.

Renminbi, denominated in yuan, has been the official currency of China since the country was established in 1949.

Literally, it means “people’s notes”, while “renmen” in Chinese means “men”.

The note features an image of former Chinese leader Mao Zedong and is widely accepted in Hong Kong retail shops.

The largest denomination is 100 yuan.

It’s the first time the Chinese currency has been misspelled in an official document in the several years Hong Kong has been promoting it after becoming the leading renminbi offshore center.

Some economists are predicting that the Hong Kong dollar will have a diminishing role after mainland China opens its capital account in the next decade.

After that, the Hong Kong unit may be repegged to the Chinese currency from the United States dollar, they said.

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JP/RA

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