Date
26 September 2017
Both brands use the bear on the cover of their cookie cans. Next to each other, it's hard to tell them apart. Photo: Internet
Both brands use the bear on the cover of their cookie cans. Next to each other, it's hard to tell them apart. Photo: Internet

How Jenny’s cookies are inspiring copycats and cheats

Jenny Bakery’s hand-made butter cookies are popular in Hong Kong. They are also hit souvenirs mainland visitors wouldn’t miss for anything.

The success of the 10-year-old cookie maker has inevitably inspired copycats. Jini Bakery Cookies is one of them.

Jini cookies’ flavours and tastes resemble those of Jenny’s.

Both of them use the bear as cover design on their cookie cans. If you put them side by side, you’d be hard pressed to tell them apart.

However, their fortunes are vastly different.

When an Apple Daily reporter recently visited to a Jini shop, there was no customer at all. At the same time, more than a hundred people were lining up outside a Jenny Bakery outlet.

One mainland visitor queued for more than two hours for a dozen boxes of Jenny Bakery’s cookies which cost him more than HK$1,000. 

To serve those who don’t want to queue, many shops in Tsim Sha Tsui resell Jenny’s cookies for a quick profit.

The selling price can be as much as HK$200 (US$25.80) a box compared with HK$135 in the official stores.

The popular treat even has its own page on Taobao, but some bad merchants are trying to take Jenny cookie lovers for a ride.

Jenny has already identified 67 shops selling fake products on the e-commerce platform.

Apparently, somebody is also trying to sell Jini cookies as Jenny cookies to cheat customers.

On Monday, Jini took out a full-page ad in local newspapers that “some third parties have flipped Jini ‘s cookies as products of other brands”, according to Apple Daily.

– Contact us at [email protected]

RA

EJ Insight writer

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