Date
24 September 2017
Lee Wing-tat (L) has accused fellow Democratic Party member Tik Chi-yun (R) of acting as Beijing's mouthpiece and supporting a flawed 2017 electoral reform plan. Photos: HKEJ
Lee Wing-tat (L) has accused fellow Democratic Party member Tik Chi-yun (R) of acting as Beijing's mouthpiece and supporting a flawed 2017 electoral reform plan. Photos: HKEJ

Tik Chi-yuen under fire for supporting Beijing’s reform proposal

Democratic Party’s Lee Wing-tat has slammed the party’s former vice chairman Tik Chi-yuen for the latter’s stance over political reform proposal for Hong Kong, Ming Pao Daily News reported Thursday.

Branding Tik as a Beijing mouthpiece, Lee wrote on his Facebook page that Tik might be looking to follow in the footsteps of former Democratic Party member Andrew Fung and join the government.

Fung has become information coordinator at the Office of the Chief Executive.

The Democratic Party said Tik’s comments do not represent the views of the party.

Tik, meanwhile, said the party should allow its members to express opinions freely. It will not help the party if it isolates people with different viewpoints, he said.

Tik, who revealed in a radio program on Wednesday that he visited Beijing as a member of the Central Policy Unit last week, said he has no plans as of now to withdraw from the Democratic Party.

He said his trip to Beijing was an effort to gauge the central government’s bottom line on Hong Kong universal suffrage in 2017.

During a meeting with Chen Zuoer, former deputy director of the State Council’s Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office, Tik is said to have conveyed to the mainland official that surveys have shown that the Hong Kong public are largely in favor of accepting the existing proposal of the National People’s Congress.

Tik urged the pan-democrats to consider the will of the public.

Chen is currently the chairman of the National Association of Study on Hong Kong and Macau.

Tik said he has been highly involved in Democratic Party matters over the years, and that he will not consider quitting as he has many close partners within the organization.

This was not the first time the Democratic Party has had conflicts with its members. Earlier this month, when member Law Chi-kwong, an associate professor at the University of Hong Kong, suggested “bundled nominations” for the 2017 Chief Executive election, member Albert Ho came out to clarify that Law’s idea does not represent the party’s view.

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