Date
19 November 2017
Anson Chan has called for a dialogue on her think-tank's suggestions with regard to Hong Kong's political reform. Photo: HKEJ
Anson Chan has called for a dialogue on her think-tank's suggestions with regard to Hong Kong's political reform. Photo: HKEJ

Anson Chan keen to discuss political reform proposal with Lam

Former top civil servant Anson Chan said she is keen to sit down with the current chief secretary, Carrie Lam, for a discussion on Hong Kong’s political reform path.

Chan said she is willing to lobby the pan-democrats for support if both the Hong Kong government and Beijing are willing to consider proposals put forward by Hong Kong 2020, Apple Daily reported Friday.

Hong Kong 2020 is a group that was launched by Chan in 2013 to monitor and comment on the constitutional reform progress in the city.

Chan remarked that Leung Chun-ying, Hong Kong’s current chief executive, has caused annoyance to many sections of the society, including the left-wing and the pro-democracy camps as well as those who were taking a neutral stance.

The former chief secretary disagreed with the suggestions that if no progress is made on political reform, Leung will benefit in terms of re-election for a second term.

Beijing will take into account Leung’s lowly popularity among the public before making a decision on a second term, she said.

Chan’s think-tank has proposed that anyone who gets 10 percent of votes on the nominating panel for the chief executive election should be listed on the ballot paper as a “recommended candidate” alongside the two or three formal candidates who qualify by securing the required 50 percent support.

If no formal candidate, or only recommended candidates, receive more than half of the public votes in the first round, the city must hold a run-off between the top two contestants, be they formal or recommended candidates, according to the proposal.

In that case, the nominating committee is required to endorse the recommended candidates for the run-off.

The proposal will not dilute the nomination committee’s power and is compliant to the framework set out by the National People’s Congress on August 31 last year, Chan said.

She insisted that Hong Kong people should not let the government’s political reform bill be passed at the Legislative Council if Beijing makes no concession.

If the plan is not adjusted, the so-called universal suffrage would be meaningless, Chan said.

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EL/AC/RC

 

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