Date
23 November 2017
The Court of Final Appeal (L) and the Tsim Sha Tsui promenade (R) were the venues for the latest political graffiti attacks in Hong Kong. Photos: Metro Daily, YouTube
The Court of Final Appeal (L) and the Tsim Sha Tsui promenade (R) were the venues for the latest political graffiti attacks in Hong Kong. Photos: Metro Daily, YouTube

Court of Final Appeal targeted in new HK graffiti attack

The Court of Final Appeal became the latest target in a graffiti attack in Hong Kong, with some unknown persons scribbling words that seek to cast the judiciary in an unfavorable light.

Security guards on Monday found two pillars near the entrance at the court smeared with simplified Chinese characters that read “Unfair and Unjust Judiciary”, Ming Pao Daily News reported. 

Meanwhile, in another incident, vandals scribbled a message “Fxxk 689″ at the Tsim Sha Tsui promenade, the report said.

It was apparently in reference to Leung Chun-ying who won Hong Kong’s chief executive election in 2012 after securing 689 votes out of a 1200-member nomination committee.

The two graffiti incidents took the total number of such cases to 27 this year, or an average of around three per week, Ming Pao noted.

The messages included topics such as Hong Kong independence and genuine universal suffrage, as well as insults or chants directed at the police.

Academic Lai Ding-kee from the City University of Hong Kong said some people may have opted for graffiti to vent out their frustrations as the government has failed to respond to popular concerns.

Of the 27 cases so far this year, 11 took place on Hong Kong Island, while New Territories and Kowloon had ten and six cases respectively.

Seven counts of messages on “Hong Kong independence” were recorded, while umbrella signs and messages calling for genuine universal suffrage appeared five times.

There were four cases of graffiti directed at the police, while there were also some messages calling on Leung to step down.

Lee Ho-yin, associate professor at the University of Hong Kong’s Architectural Conservation Programme, said the scribbles outside the Court of Final Appeal were made using oil-based markers.

Since the pillars were granite structures with sturdy and rough surface, the stains should easily come off when cleaned with water and conventional detergents, he said.

– Contact us at english@hkej.com

EL/AC/RC

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