Date
12 December 2017
In the Wan Chai unit (left), a foldable bench serves as a bed. In the Yau Ma Tei unit (right), the toilet doesn't have a door. Photos: Sky Post
In the Wan Chai unit (left), a foldable bench serves as a bed. In the Yau Ma Tei unit (right), the toilet doesn't have a door. Photos: Sky Post

30 sq ft unit snapped up for HK$2,500 monthly rent

Owners of subdivided flats are becoming increasingly creative in generating revenue from every inch of space, Sky Post reported Monday.

The newspaper found advertised online a unit in a subdivided flat that its owner claimed was the cheapest in Wan Chai.

The landlord was asking a monthly rent of HK$2,500 for the 30-square-foot space.

The tenant would also have to pay a monthly water bill of HK$50 and an electricity fee of HK$1.50 per unit, 60 percent higher than the market rate of HK$0.933 per unit.

The “highly compact” unit was taken up by a tenant just nine days after the advertisement was posted, yet another indication of the high demand for low-cost accommodation in Hong Kong.

A real estate agent said the tiny flat was carved out of the space left over after dividing a flat into six subdivided units.

“The landlord decided that the remaining 30 sq ft better not be wasted,” the agent said.

The unit has a foldable bench that can be used as a single bed.

The toilet is so small that a user has to sit sideways on the toilet seat.

Another tiny unit, in a subdivided flat in Yau Ma Tei, had originally been a small corridor leading to a toilet, which has no door.

In the online ad, the landlord highlighted its convenient location, three minutes’ walk from the MTR’s Yau Ma Tei Station.

The 40 sq ft unit was rented for HK$2,200 a month 18 days after it was first advertised, despite not being air-conditioned.

The space available for a bed, which would take up the entire width of the unit, is only two-and-a-half feet (76 centimeters) wide.

Chan Siu-ming of the concern group Shadow Long-Term Housing Strategy Steering Committee said tenants of such small units in subdivided flats are often young people who make over HK$10,000 a month but cannot afford private housing.

“They are trying to save up in the hope of buying an entry-level flat of their own,” Chan said.

– Contact us at [email protected]

EL/AC/FL

EJI Weekly Newsletter

Please click here to unsubscribe