Date
25 September 2017
If the election reform bill is rejected, 41.6 percent of respondents in a survey said pan-democrats should be held responsible. About 37.3 percent said they would blame the government, with 30.5 percent pointing the finger at Beijing. Photo: AFP
If the election reform bill is rejected, 41.6 percent of respondents in a survey said pan-democrats should be held responsible. About 37.3 percent said they would blame the government, with 30.5 percent pointing the finger at Beijing. Photo: AFP

Legislators face fallout over election reform vote, says survey

Six in 10 Hong Kong people will withdraw support from any legislator who votes against their wishes over the government’s election reform proposal, according to a university survey.

About 50.9 percent of 1,112 respondents interviewed by Lingnan University said legislators should pass the measure, Ming Pao Daily reported Tuesday.

Less than four in 10 said they should reject it and just over one in 10 had no comment.

But lawmakers who go one way or the other against the preferences of individual voters will be thrown out in the next election, the survey found. 

The poll, which was commissioned by TVB, was the first survey since Chief Secretary Carrie Lam presented the proposal in the Legislative Council on Wednesday.

The respondents were evenly divided about their opinion of the election framework for the 2017 chief executive election which gives China the right to pre-screen candidates before they are voted on by universal suffrage.

About 35.5 percent rejected the proposal outright against a slightly lower percentage who said they support it. Another 25.1 percent were undecided.

If the bill is rejected, 41.6 percent of the respondents said pan-democrat legislators should be held responsible while 37.3 percent said they would blame the government. About 30.5 percent said Beijing would be at fault.

The poll did not mention the results of previous surveys, suggesting a government campaign to promote the plan will not have much impact on public opinion, said Ma Ngok, dean of the Chinese University of Hong Kong Department of Government and Administration.

New People’s Party leader Regina Ip said she expects more public support for the proposal and urged pan-democrats to “accept it without hesitation”.

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