Date
26 March 2017
Accepting the electoral proposal will kill Hong Kong, a group of tertiary students said in a video (left) parodying a commercial in which senior government officials promote the plan.  Photos: YouTube
Accepting the electoral proposal will kill Hong Kong, a group of tertiary students said in a video (left) parodying a commercial in which senior government officials promote the plan. Photos: YouTube

Gap shrinking between backers, foes of electoral reform plan

Hongkongers’ support for the government’s electoral reform proposal continues to decline while opposition to it continues to rise, Apple Daily reported Thursday, citing the latest rolling poll by three major universities 

The gap between supporters and opponents has been narrowing since the polls began last month after the government unveiled the plan in the Legislative Council.

About 42.3 percent of respondents in the May 5-9 survey, the 13th of its kind, said they support the idea of “pocket it first”, the lowest since the series of polls started.

By contrast, 40.3 percent said they oppose the idea, the highest so far.

About 18 percent still said they had no opinion.

In the poll, conducted by the University of Hong Kong, the Chinese University of Hong Kong and the Hong Kong Polytechnic University, 1,130 people were interviewed.

An analysis of the first four surveys in the series shows that those who are most in favor of the government’s proposal are either aged 60 or above or have primary education or less.

Most of the opponents are aged between 18 and 29, with tertiary education.

The breakdown has remained unchanged.

Dr. Chung Kim-wah, director of the Center for Social Policy Studies at PolyU, said the opposition rate will fail to eventually surpass the support rate only if the government doesn’t make any more mistakes and there are no further offensive remarks from the pro-establishment camp, such as those from former chief executive Tung Chee-hwa and former justice secretary Elsie Leung Oi-sie.

If the government does not revise its plan, Chung said, it would be impossible for it to gain approval from the majority of the public.

James Tien Pei-chun, honorary chairman of the Liberal Party, and Democratic Party chairwoman Emily Lau, said they were not surprised to see the gap shrinking, as district visits made by senior government officials to promote the plan have backfired.


(Cantonese) by Tertiary Students Political Reform Concern Group

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