Date
27 May 2017
Civil Human Right Front will organize rallies against Hong Kong's political reform bill as lawmakers prepare for a key vote on June 17. But there is unlikely to be a repeat of last year's street blockades. Photo: EJ Insight
Civil Human Right Front will organize rallies against Hong Kong's political reform bill as lawmakers prepare for a key vote on June 17. But there is unlikely to be a repeat of last year's street blockades. Photo: EJ Insight

Electoral bill opponents plan regular rallies until Legco vote

The Civil Human Rights Front said it will organize rallies from Sunday to express the group’s opposition to the government’s political reform package.

The rallies will be held every evening until the Legislative Council (Legco) vote on June 17, said the organization which focuses on issues related to political and livelihood issues in Hong Kong.

The group said it will not do anything unlawful or resort to road blockades, unlike what happened during the Occupy protests last year, regardless of the outcome of the political reform bill.

However, it warned that some other organizations could launch civil disobedience if the reform bill is passed.

Student group Scholarism said protesters are likely to storm the government headquarters if the reform package is passed, RTHK reported.

Groups from both the democracy campaign and pro-establishment camp will hold rallies outside the Legco when the reform package is discussed on Wednesday.

Leung Che-cheung, a lawmaker belonging to the pro-establishment camp, said he will organize a 2,000-person rally.

He appealed to all participants to observe restraint.

Chan Kin-por, who represents the insurance sector, told DBC Radio on Friday that security arrangements for the vote will be discussed in Legco on Monday.

“As there are reports that some people have asked thousands of people to surround the Legco, we must be prepared well in security and reserve some time for the police to get ready,” Chan told.

Kenneth Chan Ka-lok, another lawmaker, said he does not agree with plans to allow the police to enter the Legco and get ready in advance.

As the Legco has its own security team, the police should enter only if there is a need, he said.

Cyd Ho Sau-lan, a member of the Labour Party, said police must enter Legco only in an emergency situation.

Ip Kwok-him, a lawmaker from the Democratic Alliance for the Betterment and Progress of Hong Kong (DAB), said the top priority should be ensuring personal safety for lawmakers and that the voting can take place smoothly.

“There is a system to decide if the police can enter the Legco to perform their duty,” Ip said.

 – Contact us at [email protected]

RC

EJ Insight intern reporter

EJI Weekly Newsletter

Please click here to unsubscribe