Date
21 January 2017
The rehabilitation center organizes training to help its residents find jobs and get assimilated back into society. Photo: Correctional Services Department
The rehabilitation center organizes training to help its residents find jobs and get assimilated back into society. Photo: Correctional Services Department

Troubled teens: All is not lost

When Yanka (not her real name) was sent to a rehabilitation center for a drug offense, she was devastated and thought it was game over for her.

Now, with only three months to go before her release, she is hopeful and sees life from a very different perspective.

In a dessert-making competition arranged by Lai King Correctional Institution, Yanka named her work “hope” and dedicated it to her mother, making sure it suited her preference for less sugar.

Although she knew she could get out sooner on good behavior, she tangled with the center’s top officer early on.

She did not take too well to her punishment, Yanka told stheadline.com.

Her mother’s unfailing love changed her mind.

Yanka’s mother, who comes to see her often, told Yanka she will wait for her “even if the whole world leaves you behind”.

In time, she learned to adapt to the sense of discipline in the center.

“I will treasure what I learned about how to deal with people for the rest of my life,” she told the newspaper.

Yanka is preparing to start afresh.

She has done a number of courses in catering and retail services. Her dream is to become an expert manicurist.

Ah Shing (not his real name) is another hopeful case.

He used to be rebellious and often ran away from home.

He hated his father for being too strict and bossy.

In a video interview from his Correctional Services Department office, Wu Yu-shing, the Lai Hang Rehabilitation Center officer in charge of Ah Shing, recalled what it was like when he first met the boy, then only 19.

“Ah Shing was emotionally unstable. He didn’t get on well with other trainees,” Wu said.

Ah Shing has now learned better self-control and become more patient.

“I realize how important it is to think about the consequences before doing something. I will ask if it is really good for me,” Ah Shing said.

Officer Wu serves as a bridge and lubricant between Ah Shing and his father by relaying their thoughts and how they truly feel about each other.

One major objective of the center is to help its residents get back to society by providing a job-matching platform.

Information about job vacancies is available on a regular basis.

Ah Shing has joined the center’s rice dumpling production project and is now honing his culinary skills.

He is looking forward to a family reunion and his father is hoping he will one day become a successful chef.

Meanwhile, Wu is delighted with Ah Shing’s progress, calling it a great source of job satisfaction and motivation.

– Contact us at [email protected]

RA

This entry won the top honors in a dessert-making tournament organized by Lai King Correction Center. Photo: stheadline.com


Yanka named her cake “hope” and dedicated it to her mother, making sure it suited her preference for less sugar. Photo: stheadline.com


EJ Insight writer

EJI Weekly Newsletter