Date
28 July 2017
Yung Jing-jing (left photo) says she recited a famous Buddhist poem to test a man who claimed to be a monk (right). Photo: Facebook
Yung Jing-jing (left photo) says she recited a famous Buddhist poem to test a man who claimed to be a monk (right). Photo: Facebook

How to deal with a fake monk? Take it from Yung Jing-jing

If you think you’re being scammed, shout.

If the culprit is an impostor dressed as a monk, try reciting a famous Buddhist poem and see what happens.

Mary Jean Reimer had the presence of mind to practice these counter measures after an encounter with a man who tried to stick her foreigner friend with a HK$20 (US$2.58) bracelet.

The incident happened outside the Shangri-La hotel in Tsimshatsui when Reimer and her friend were approached by the Putoghua-speaking man.

Reimer, a lawyer more famously known as the actress Yung Jing-jing, recounted the encounter in a Facebok post.

She said when the man tried to hawk the bracelet to her friend, she tested him by reciting a famous Buddhist poem.

The man pretended not to hear what she was saying. In fact, he didn’t know the title of the poem, let alone how it goes, according to Metro Hong Kong.

Reimer screamed that the monk is a fake, alerting policemen nearby, but the man had scurried away when the cops arrived.

She said tourists who engage in hawking are in breach of their conditions of stay and could be jailed.

Also, people could alert the police to such activities including those by purported Buddhist monks, she said.

Reimer said there have been instances when Putonghua-speaking monks would visit temples and refuse to leave.

They would solicit money from the temple and hassle visitors for alms.

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EL/AC/RA

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