Date
16 January 2017
A same-sex wedding organizer has to check out all the intricate legal details and arrangements in the country where it will take place. Photo: Internet
A same-sex wedding organizer has to check out all the intricate legal details and arrangements in the country where it will take place. Photo: Internet

Same-sex wedding organizer taps niche market

LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) is a sensitive issue in Hong Kong, and it will probably stay that way for many years to come.

In fact, in the whole Asian region, not a single country legally allows same-sex marriage.

But according to same-sex wedding organizer Vincci Cheung, she is getting an increasing number of requests.

“Last year, I normally had two to three enquiries a month. This year, I am getting a number of enquiries every week,” Cheung told Hong Kong Economic Journal Monthly.

Cheung’s company BEvisible arranges for couples to get married overseas, mainly in Canada, New Zealand and the United Kingdom.

Its one-stop service covers registration, legal procedures, wedding photos, venue and transportation.

Cheung is not one of them, but two years ago, one of her best friends (a guy) wanted to get married to another guy, and she had to help him out. That’s how the whole thing started.

Compared with traditional marriages, Cheung has to do a little bit more research when dealing with same-sex marriages such as knowing the legal provisions and other particulars in different countries very well.

“In France, you need to stay for a certain period before applying, so it’s difficult to do it during a short trip. In England, the minimum period is about two weeks, shorter for Scotland. For Canada, depending on the province, the rules, steps and departments responsible vary,” she said.

But if the couples are only looking to take photos and don’t care about the official registration, their choice of destinations will be much wider.

The best thing about her work is that she is dealing with a niche market, which means competition is quite limited.

Expensive marketing campaigns won’t be necessary; they won’t be effective, either. The reason is obvious: the majority of people don’t need such services.

There is also no need to maintain an office.

Cheung opened her business in 2013, it broke even last year, and things are looking good so far this year.

She is also getting lots of enquiries from China, Macau and Taiwan.

To get ready for more business, Cheung is stepping up her research.

“I am starting to look into the possibilities of Canada’s Yellowknife. [Getting married in) Aurora Village should be quite romantic,” she said.

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CG

EJ Insight writer

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