Date
26 July 2017
About 10 percent of calls to a suicide prevention helpline are about financial hardship, with more than half involving men. Photo: HKEJ
About 10 percent of calls to a suicide prevention helpline are about financial hardship, with more than half involving men. Photo: HKEJ

Men more prone to suicide than women over money

Money troubles are likely to drive men to commit suicide more than women.

Also, people in their thirties and forties are most affected by unemployment and other money-related problems, according to Suicide Prevention Services, a Hong Kong helpline.

The charity released its latest study to coincide with World Suicide Prevention Day on Thursday.

It received 133,880 calls from people seeking help in the four years to 2014, according to Sing Tao Daily.

About 10 percent, or 10,800 calls, were about financial hardship, with more than half involving men.

In the first six months, nearly 60 percent of male callers said they were troubled by joblessness compared with 32 percent of women with a similar problem.

The study reviewed a coroner’s report and found that the number of suicides fell 3.2 percent in 2014 from the previous year.

However, suicides by people 30 to 49 years old rose more than 16 percent.

Vincent Ng, executive director of the charity, said middle-aged people often find it hard to share their feelings with others when they are under financial pressure.

This is especially the case for men because they are embarrassed to admit it, he said.

Ng said people in this situation could become depressed and more vulnerable to suicide.

With signs of a weakening economy, Ng is urging Hongkongers to pay more attention to their mental health and show more empathy to people in distress.

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TL/AC/RA

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