Date
19 October 2017
A school girl with Guzheng (L) being questioned by MTR staff. Netizens have blasted the rail firm, asking why it allowed items such as washing machine (upper right) and martial arts props (lower right) in the past. Photos: Facebook
A school girl with Guzheng (L) being questioned by MTR staff. Netizens have blasted the rail firm, asking why it allowed items such as washing machine (upper right) and martial arts props (lower right) in the past. Photos: Facebook

MTR comes under fire again over ‘oversized’ luggage

MTR Corp. is again facing questions over its handling of “oversized” passenger luggage, with critics accusing the commuter rail operator of double standard in enforcing the rule.

On Tuesday, a picture surfaced on social media of a uniformed high school girl being accosted by MTR staff for carrying a Guzheng, a traditional Chinese musical instrument.

In the incident which is said to have taken place at Tai Wai station, the rail staff reportedly told the girl that she cannot enter the platform as she was carrying an oversized item.

The girl didn’t know what do do, and eventually left the station without getting her transport, according to an Apple Daily report.  

An account of her experience soon surfaced on social media. A Facebook page titled “Tai Wai Alliance” drew plenty of comment, with people slamming MTR over the treatment of the girl. 

The musical instrument she was carrying had roughly the same height as the girl.

Netizens said MTR staff should focus more on preventing parallel-goods traders from carrying bulky goods on trains, rather than stopping locals going about their business.

Many musicians also expressed dismay, recounting their own experiences, and urged the rail operator to review its policies and regulations.

According to MTR rules, the sum of the length, width and height of a piece of hand-carried luggage should not exceed 170 centimeters.

In July, former professional snooker player Ivan Chan Kwok-ming is said to have been issued a warning letter by the MTR for carrying a 1.6-meter long cue stick on a local train.

Netizens then posted a series of photos to show that MTR enforces the rules selectively. Among the pictures was one of a man carrying a Guandao — a pole weapon used in some forms of Chinese martial arts — and another carrying a washing machine.

Questions were raised as to why MTR allowed such luggage, while blocking others. The rail company seems to have double standard in dealing with the cases, netizens remarked.

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BT/AC/RC

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