Date
26 March 2017
Moshe Kai Cavalin thanks his parents for giving him personal instruction and allowing him to choose his extra-curricular activities. Photo: AP
Moshe Kai Cavalin thanks his parents for giving him personal instruction and allowing him to choose his extra-curricular activities. Photo: AP

He’s got two college degrees, works for NASA and he’s just 17

Moshe Kai Cavalin, from San Gabriel, California, is what most people would call gifted.

At 17, he’s got two college degrees under his belt, flies airplanes and works for NASA.

But Moshe thinks he’s just an ordinary teenager.

“My case isn’t that special. It’s just a combination of parenting and motivation and inspiration,” he told the Associated Press.

“I tend to not compare myself that often to other people. I just try to do the best I can.”

Moshe entered East Los Angeles College when he was only eight, making him the youngest college student in the United States, and graduated with the highest grade point average of 4.0.

By the age of nine Moshe was writing an autobiography that would later turn out a bestseller. He’s just published a second book, also partly based on his personal experiences.

At 15, he graduated from the University of California, Los Angeles with a bachelor’s degree in mathematics.

This year, he started pursuing an online master’s degree in cybersecurity, although he decided to postpone his studies to help NASA develop surveillance technology for airplanes and drones.

He’s also into martial arts, having won several tournaments, and plans to get his pilot’s license by the end of the year.

Moshe thanks his parents for giving him personal instruction and allowing him to choose his extra-curricular activities.

His mother is from Taiwan and his father is from Brazil.

His parents say he’s a quick study. At four months, Moshe pointed to a jet in the sky and said the Chinese word for airplane, his first word.

At three years old, Moshe started reading and solving math problems.

Public school teachers thought his learning abilities might have a negative impact on the education of his classmates, so his parents decided on home-schooling for their precocious child.

At NASA, Moshe works on simulations of airplanes and drones that are headed for collision, and finding ways to bring them safety.

His boss and mentor Ricardo Arteaga says Moshe is perfect for the job because it involves mathematics, computers and aircraft technology.

Watch Moshe Kai Cavalin on YouTube:

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CG

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