Date
19 October 2017
Devil’s Peak is a good choice for lazy hikers who prefer a relatively uncomplicated climb. Photo: HKEJ
Devil’s Peak is a good choice for lazy hikers who prefer a relatively uncomplicated climb. Photo: HKEJ

Devil’s Peak: Kowloon’s fortress hill

Most people would think of hiking as an arduous activity that involves climbing steep hills and trekking rugged paths in the middle of nowhere in the New Territories, usually on a Saturday morning.

It’s actually easier than you imagine. There’s always a small hill somewhere in the city waiting for you to conquer.

Devil’s Peak (魔鬼山), for instance, is a good choice for lazy hikers who prefer a relatively uncomplicated climb.

Before going up, take a detour to Lei Yue Mun (鯉魚門) for a touch of nostalgia.

Lei Yue Mun on Kowloon peninsula has become synonymous to seafood. However, the finest goodies don’t actually come from there, but from Sai Kung.

Fishermen used to bypass Lei Yue Mun to deliver their freshly-caught fish and shellfish to Hong Kong Island. But as time went by, this bay gained a reputation as a good spot for seafood dining.

In the early 1950s, Lei Yue Mun villagers were making a living as miners. Desolate stone houses and the old quarry can still be found on the east of Tin Hau Temple.

You might also get the chance to approach the lighthouse, that is, if the tide is low on your way to the temple.

After visiting the quarry, go back to Tin Hau Temple and there you can find the access point to Wilson Trail behind Che Ting Tsuen, up the road to the Chinese Protestant Cemetery.

Stay on the left so you can find the way up to Devil’s Peak.

Devil’s Peak was so named because of the nasty pirates who used it as a vantage point to spot commercial vessels that they wanted to raid during the Qing Dynasty.

In the early 20th century, the British army regarded it as a strategic location for guarding Victoria Harbor as well as overseeing Shau Kei Wan on Hong Kong Island.

Relics of military facilities such as batteries, trenches and forts can still seen there today. That’s why Devil’s Peak has been nicknamed “Fortress Hill” of Kowloon.

If you start off late in the morning, you’ll probably just be in time to enjoy an afternoon tea at an old café in Cha Kwo Ling village after the hike.

Getting there:

To go to Yau Tong: Take Exit A2 of Yau Tong MTR station.

To leave from Cha Kwo Ling (茶果嶺): Walk around 10 minutes to Lam Tin MTR station.

Time: About two hours

This article appeared in the Hong Kong Economic Journal on Oct. 29.

Translation by Darlie Yiu

[Chinese version中文版]

– Contact us at [email protected]

DY/JP/CG

You might get the chance to approach the lighthouse if the tide is low. Photo: pfigaron.net


Desolate stone houses and the old quarry can still be found at Lei Yue Mun Point. Photo: pfigaron.net


Relics of military facilities such as batteries, trenches and forts can be seen at Devil’s Peak. Photo: kwuntong.org.hk


Enjoy an afternoon tea at Cha Kwo Ling village after the hike. Photo: HKEJ


HKEJ contributor

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