Date
23 May 2017
Nakade Hitsujiko (centre) had to edit his campaign mailings (inset) to avoid phrases that the Registration and Electoral Office deemed infringed the Basic Law. Photos: Ming Pao, Facebook
Nakade Hitsujiko (centre) had to edit his campaign mailings (inset) to avoid phrases that the Registration and Electoral Office deemed infringed the Basic Law. Photos: Ming Pao, Facebook

District council candidate arrested in money-laundering case

Nakade Hitsujiko, a losing candidate in Sunday’s district council elections, has been arrested on suspicion of money laundering, Ming Pao Daily reported Thursday.

Nakade, 23, who changed his name from Chung Ming-lun, was arrested and taken to Tai Po Police Station on Wednesday for allegedly receiving HK$1.5 million (US$190,000) from a suspected email scam.

Police also arrested a 47-year-old man surnamed Lam on Nov. 4 for allegedly receiving over HK$600,000 in relation to the scam.

Authorities said employees of a firm in mainland China reported on Jan. 16 that their company had fallen prey to an email scam.

They had been asked to wire a total of HK$2.17 million to two bank accounts in Hong Kong.

Lam, who was released on bail and is due to report back to police in mid-December, is believed to be the owner of one of the two bank accounts.

Under the Organised and Serious Crime Ordinance, any person found guilty of dealing with property known or believed to represent proceeds of an indictable offense could be sentenced to jail for 14 years and fined up to HK$5 million.

Nakade secured 172 votes in Tai Kok Tsui last Sunday, 6 percent of the valid votes in his constituency, and so was spared having his election deposit of HK$3,000 forfeited, which would have occurred if he had won fewer than 5 percent of the valid votes.

He is a follower of Horace Chin Wan-kan, an assistant professor in the department of Chinese at Lingnan University, the author, under the pen name Wan Chin, of the book Hong Kong as a City-State.

Nakade’s attempt to include phrases in his campaign mailings such as “nation building for Hong Kong city-state” was rejected by the Registration and Electoral Office, which ruled that the phrases were against the Basic Law.

The radical activist often steps out in traditional Chinese female costume and goes under other feminine nicknames online such as “Yeung Tsz-ching” or “Princess Hitsujiko”.

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EL/AC/FL

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