Date
23 May 2017
Uruguay's UN Ambassador Elbio Rosselli, current president of the Security Council, said the council will begin working immediately on new measures to take in response to North Korea's nuclear test. Photo: Reuters
Uruguay's UN Ambassador Elbio Rosselli, current president of the Security Council, said the council will begin working immediately on new measures to take in response to North Korea's nuclear test. Photo: Reuters

UN Security Council vows steps against N Korea after nuke test

The UN Security Council has vowed to take new measures against North Korea after Pyongyang said it had tested a hydrogen bomb.

The council condemned the test, saying “a clear threat to international peace and security continues to exist”, BBC News reported.

The council held an emergency session on Wednesday, at the urging of the United States, Japan and South Korea.

Uruguay’s UN Ambassador Elbio Rosselli, current president of the council, said: “The members … have previously expressed their determination to take further significant measures in the event of another [North Korea] nuclear test.

“In line with this commitment and the gravity of this violation, [they] will begin to work immediately on such measures in a new Security Council resolution.”

It is North Korea’s fourth nuclear test since 2006, and, if confirmed, it would be the first for an H-bomb.

Many have voiced doubts about Pyongyang’s claim, however. Nuclear experts questioned whether the blast was large enough for such a test.

US White House spokesman Josh Earnest said “initial analysis was not consistent with North Korea’s claims of a successful hydrogen bomb test”.

“Nothing that has occurred in the last 24 hours has caused the United States government to change our assessment of North Korea’s technical and military capabilities,” Earnest added.

Hydrogen bombs are more powerful and technologically advanced than atomic weapons, using fusion, or the merging of atoms, to unleash massive amounts of energy, the BBC explained.

The atomic bombs dropped by the US on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in World War II involved fission, or the splitting of atoms.

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