Date
16 January 2017
A paramedic attends to the victim (inset) who said he was attacked by a couple who accused him of secretly filming them while they were making out in a public park. Photos: Google Map, Ming Pao
A paramedic attends to the victim (inset) who said he was attacked by a couple who accused him of secretly filming them while they were making out in a public park. Photos: Google Map, Ming Pao

Lovers make out in park, accuse man of secretly filming them

What would you do if you were caught on camera making out in a public park?

Stop and leave? Or get up and go after the interloper?

A pair of smitten lovers apparently were so worried they might end up on YouTube they decided to do something about it.  

That’s how a 28-year-old man lost a smartphone and HK$1,500 (US$193) in cash to the couple.

The man, surnamed Tse, told police the couple attacked him when he denied secretly filming them.

Police found a phone case near the scene of the alleged attack in a public park in Lower Wong Tai Sin Estate.

They are looking for a 25-year-old man in a black shirt and a 20-year-old woman in a pink dress, Sing Tao Daily reports.

Tse said the couple thought he was filming them and intending to post the clip on social media.

When he denied the accusation, a quarrel ensued and the lovers grabbed his smartphone, along with his wallet, Tse said.

He went to a nearby shop and called the police but the couple had left by the time the officers arrived. 

Solicitor Vitus Leung said anyone who takes such videos in a public place is not committing an offense under the privacy ordinance unless these are targeted at a person’s private parts.

If the act of filming constitutes a public nuisance, the person doing it might be liable under an ordinance against loitering, he said.  

Even so, any complaint must prove that the act caused someone monetary loss or emotional distress to warrant loitering charges.

Leung said the police would have to seek legal advice from the Department of Justice to establish breach of privacy in the case of someone being suspected of filming intimate acts in a public place.

On the other hand, the lovers would have broken the law if they engaged in indecent behavior, Leung said.

No word about whether the couple are liable for the alleged attack and for the forcible confiscation of Tse’s belongings.

You decide.

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