Date
16 January 2017
Frozen raindrops and small ice pellets were seen in Tai Mo Shan (left) and Sheung Shui (right) on Sunday. Photos: Ming Pao, Facebook
Frozen raindrops and small ice pellets were seen in Tai Mo Shan (left) and Sheung Shui (right) on Sunday. Photos: Ming Pao, Facebook

Cold snap to persist in next couple of days: Observatory

Hong Kong will continue to experience very cold weather in the next couple of days, after the lowest temperatures in almost 60 years hit the territory on Sunday.

The Hong Kong Observatory expected temperatures to remain as low as 3 degrees Celsius in the urban areas on Monday, while dropping to zero in some districts such as Sheung Shui, Tai Po and Shek Kong.

Temperatures on high ground could remain below zero degree with chance of ice and frost, Ming Pao Daily reported.

The average temperature of 3.1 degrees was recorded on Sunday, the coldest in 59 years and the third lowest since 1885. The last time the HKO recorded temperature lower than 3.1 degrees was in January 1957, when it was only 2.4 degrees.

There were reports of rain with “small ice pellets” in other parts of the territory, including Yuen Long, Kam Tin, Sheung Shui and Ta Kwu Ling.

The HKO headquarters in Tsim Sha Tsui also recorded rain with small ice pellets at around 3 p.m., but received no report of snowing.

Last week the Observatory predicted temperatures would be around 7 degrees, but adjusted its forecast downward before the weekend.

It said the gap between its forecast and actual temperatures was mainly due to the duration of rain, which was longer and heavier than expected.

The weather will remain cold in the next couple of days, and rainy in the middle and latter parts of the week, the Observatory said.

It advised people to put on warm clothing and avoid prolonged exposure to wintry winds in order to avoid adverse health effects.

Motorists and the general public should also be aware of slippery roads, it said.

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BT/AC/CG

Hikers are covered with frost under sub-zero temperatures at Tai Mo Shan, the highest mountain in Hong Kong. Photo: Reuters


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