Date
23 May 2017
Protesters wear props tainted with animal blood outside a fur and fashion fair at the HKCEC; 
Lana Wong (right) said her fur coat was given to her by her late husband 40 years ago. Photos: StandNews, Facebook
Protesters wear props tainted with animal blood outside a fur and fashion fair at the HKCEC; Lana Wong (right) said her fur coat was given to her by her late husband 40 years ago. Photos: StandNews, Facebook

Animal rights groups stage protest at fur show

Animal rights groups staged a protest against cruelty to animals on Sunday, the last day of the Hong Kong International Fur & Fashion Fair at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Center, Headline Daily Hong Kong reported Monday.

Around a hundred protesters wearing props tainted with animal blood waved placards showing images of dead animals on a footbridge leading to the HKCEC.

In response, the Hong Kong Fur Federation (HKFF) said 90 percent of the fur products imported to Hong Kong follow strict European Union regulations and are closely monitored by watchdogs.

It assured that the fur its members trade was never taken from animals while they were alive.

The HKFF has called for the animal groups to report on any manufacturers or traders deploying inhumane methods of obtaining fur to the HKFF or the International Fur Trade Federation.

No Fur Citizens Hong Kong spokesman David Wong Kai-yan said the process of fur production is a cruel one, including skinning animals who are alive and fully conscious.

“Yet many traders could still rationalize the inhumane production process and call the products environment-friendly and biodegradable,” Wong said.

HKFF director Fritz Chen Tsun-ni said Hong Kong is one of the trading centers for world fur trade with an annual turnover of up to HK$8 billion a year.

Chen said 95 percent of the fur products come from farms from the Europe and the United States and were restricted by international and EU laws, under which animals are skinned via painless ways.

The two common ways being used by the trade are carbon monoxide chambers for the small animals and electric shocks for larger animals, Chen said.

One of the protesters, surnamed Chan, brought along his three-year-old son as part of his child’s experience in animal rights protection.

Meanwhile, actress Lana Wong Ha-wai offered a diplomatic response to a citizen who complained about her wearing a mink coat on an MTR train, news website hk01.com reported Sunday.

A female netizen has uploaded a picture of Wong in her fur coat on social media, and said she was traveling on the train with “animal’s dead bodies”.

Wong replied: “Don’t be upset, my sister. This was given to me as a gift some 40 years ago by my late husband. We knew little about environmental protection back then, but I will not wear it next time.”

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