Date
26 July 2017
At least 7 percent of Hong Kong families raise dogs. An estimated 80 percent of these families live in their own property. Photo: Internet
At least 7 percent of Hong Kong families raise dogs. An estimated 80 percent of these families live in their own property. Photo: Internet

How to make a million training dogs

Dog training has not been a popular service but with rising incomes, it has become more affordable, especially to middle-class owners.

Hong Kong women also happen to have a super low fertility rate.

As a result, pets are increasingly becoming surrogate children to quite a few families.

These “parents” are willing to spend serious money on their “kids”.

Dog trainers with professional qualifications charge about HK$1,200 to HK$1,500 an hour, Hong Kong Economic Journal Monthly reports.

Even though the charge is high, demand is strong and recession-proof, a local pet trade association said.

There were about 167,000 pet-owning families in Hong Kong in 2010.

They tend to be relatively wealthy, with a quarter making HK$40,000 or more a month, according to government statistics.

Suppose a trainer teaches three to five hours a day and work 20 days a month, he or she will easily earn HK$100,000.

Pet owners typically seek help from professionals when they have a problem toilet-training their dogs, or if their dogs are too aggressive and attack people.

Too much barking, destructive chewing of things at home or fighting with other dogs are also common headaches.

Given their limited number, dog trainers can be quite picky.

“If people just WhatsApp me to ask for my price, I normally won’t accept the job,” Eddie Choi told the magazine.

“If the owners are price-sensitive, they apparently are not thinking of the best interest of their dogs. If they are genuinely seeking help, they should focus on the dog’s problem, or what they what their dogs to learn from the training.”

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RA

EJ Insight writer

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