Date
23 May 2017
Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi (second from right) and his Gambian counterpart Neneh Macdouall-Gaye sign a joint communique to resume diplomatic ties between their two countries in Beijing on Thursday. Photo: Xinhua
Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi (second from right) and his Gambian counterpart Neneh Macdouall-Gaye sign a joint communique to resume diplomatic ties between their two countries in Beijing on Thursday. Photo: Xinhua

Gambia ties end China’s diplomatic truce with Taiwan

China resumed ties with former Taiwan ally Gambia on Thursday, ending an unofficial diplomatic truce between China and Taiwan, Reuters reports.

The small West African state was one of a few African countries, along with Burkina Faso, Swaziland and São Tomé and Príncipe, to recognize Taiwan, which China regards as a wayward province to be recovered by force if necessary.

China and Taiwan had for years tried to poach each other’s allies, often dangling generous aid packages in front of leaders of developing nations.

But they began an unofficial diplomatic truce after signing a series of landmark trade and economic agreements in 2008 following Ma Ying-jeou’s election as Taiwan’s president, as Beijing tried to convince Taipei of its friendly intentions after decades of hostility and suspicion.

While Gambia severed relations with Taiwan in November 2013, causing anger in Taipei, China had held off establishing formal ties with it until now.

“From here on, China and Gambia’s relations have turned over a new leaf,” Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi told his Gambian counterpart, Neneh Macdouall-Gaye, China’s Foreign Ministry said in a statement.

“The early resumption of ties accords with the basic interests of both countries and conforms to the trend of the times and general trend of the development of China-Africa friendship and cooperation,” Wang added.

Macdouall-Gaye, in comments carried on Chinese state television, said the Gambian nation supported “the national reunification, peaceful reunification” of China and Taiwan.

Beijing has repeatedly warned against any moves toward independence since Tsai Ing-wen and her pro-independence Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) won the presidential and parliamentary elections. Tsai assumes office in May.

Tsai has said she would maintain peace with China, and Chinese state-run media have noted her pledges to maintain the “status quo” with China.

Taiwan must not let this kind of incident happen again, the DPP said in a statement, referring to China’s rapprochement with Gambia, and was committed to consolidating diplomatic relations once it took power.

It also said it hoped China and Taiwan would not engage in “target competition,” while the Foreign Ministry expressed regret over the Gambia move.

Gambia had recognized mainland China from 1974 to 1995, before switching over to Taiwan.

Other countries with diplomatic ties with Taiwan include the tiny Pacific island states of Nauru and Palau, as well as Vatican City, Paraguay, Panama, Haiti, and Nicaragua.

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CG

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