Date
26 May 2017
In ancient China, holders of special military badges could go anywhere simply by showing an imperial order printed on the reverse. Photo: Studio Sorry/Facebook, baidu.com
In ancient China, holders of special military badges could go anywhere simply by showing an imperial order printed on the reverse. Photo: Studio Sorry/Facebook, baidu.com

Leung privilege tokens anyone?

If nothing else, the airport saga that has embroiled Hong Kong’s first family has inspired creative ideas.

Souvenir tokens inscribed with the words “special measures” are literally flying off the shelves.

Design company Studio Sorry said it has been swamped with orders for the military-style badges since the first batch of 100 sold out in four days, news website hk01.com reports.

The tokens are patterned on an ancient Chinese military badge used to authenticate an imperial order and bestow its holder certain privileges.

The Studio Sorry version features the word Leung on the front and a message on the back that reads: “Special measures must be taken for special problems on demand of the bearer of this token”.

Its designer, named Moona, said the overwhelming response from consumers has taken them by surprise.

“We did not plan to make too many of the tokens and to make money from this,” she said.

Moona said the Leung family airport drama “reminded us of secret agents of the imperial court who were able to travel to any place simply by presenting a token issued to them by the emperor”.

The Leung tokens, which sell for 68.90 yuan (HK$82.50) each, are made of wood and feature laser-engraved design and text.

Moona said they were making the token for fun and had no idea what others might make of it.

“We want the buyers to exercise their own creativity in using the product,” she said.

Now that orders are flying in, Moona said she and her colleagues are getting stressed out trying to cope with demand for “special privileges”.

Those words have come to be associated with the Leungs after the Hong Kong chief executive intervened to have a piece of carry-on luggage sorted after his younger daughter had left it in the passenger check-in area in Hong Kong airport.   

Leung was accused of abusing his power, a claim he denied.

[Go to Studio Sorry]

– Contact us at [email protected]

EL/AC/RA

The front of the badge has the name Leung laser-engraved on it. The back features a message worthy of the privileged class. Photo: Studio Sorry/Facebook


EJI Weekly Newsletter

Please click here to unsubscribe