Date
11 December 2017
A USB drive similar to the one above (inset) went missing from the Lai Chi Kok Reception Center. A lorry driver later found it on the dash board of his truck. Photos: Google Maps, baidu
A USB drive similar to the one above (inset) went missing from the Lai Chi Kok Reception Center. A lorry driver later found it on the dash board of his truck. Photos: Google Maps, baidu

Prison fight video goes viral after CSD thumb drive goes missing

A video clip of a prison riot at the Lai Chi Kok Reception Center has surfaced on the internet after a USB flash drive containing confidential data went missing.

The video was uploaded to Facebook by a man who said he found it in his lorry, Apple Daily reports.

The Correctional Services Department (CSD) is investigating the incident to see if there has been criminal negligence.

The supposedly encrypted thumb drive had gone missing since June 5 but was not reported to CSD authorities.

It contains confidential prisoner data as well personal and official records of correctional officers, according to the report.

The prison fight video was among many that came from the leaked USB flash memory.

CSD officers are allowed to take confidential data out of prison premises but it should be saved in encrypted format.

The concerned officer is responsible for its security, the report said, citing prison officials.

A lorry driver, surnamed Cheung, said he found the device on the dash board of his truck with “CSD” written on the sides.    

He said he found “a lot of personal data” on the drive, including the residential addresses of correctional officers, X-ray scans and assorted video clips.

The clips are like those seen in the Hong Kong movie Prison On Fire, with violent gang fights between prisoners, Cheung said.

Senior barrister Albert Luk said any person who found a USB and uploaded confidential content to social media might be committing a crime.

The person will be liable to prosecution for illegal access to a computer with intent to commit an offence or with a dishonest intent.

The maximum penalty is 10 years and five years in prison, respectively.

Luk said prisoners whose identity might have been exposed or their personal information compromised could sue for civil claims and negligence.

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